Natural variations in semiprecious gemstones

The reason everyone loves gemstones.

Like all natural materials, semiprecious gemstones exhibit natural variations called inclusions or flaws in their structure. The beauty of any gemstone is a matter of opinion, and the decision of whether an inclusion is beautiful or unattractive is a personal one.

A couple of examples of semiprecious gemstones that have pronounced inclusions are “tektites,” which are also considered “astral gemstones,” and the “chrysanthemum stone.” “Tektites” are gemstones formed when a giant meteroite strikes the Earth. The heated impact creates pronounced inclusions resembling small holes or crystals over a vast area, fusing extraterrestrial energies of the meteroite with our Mother Earth.  The “chrysanthemum stone” is a mahogany colored stone with “flowered” inclusions that resemble the shape of a chrysanthemum flower.

The “uniqueness” of each semiprecious gemstone is the real reason everyone loves semiprecious gemstones. The value of semiprecious gemstones are determined by several factors, primarily their popularity, rarity and quality. With the exception of diamonds, the price of semiprecious gemstones are set by the gemstone market demand.

At https://www.squareup.com/store/circlesofgemstones you will see many examples of handcrafted semiprecious gemstone jewelry that exhibit natural variations in their structure. The featured image of this blog shows an example of this. The large round, irregular shaped black gemstones are tektites, and the small, round gemstones are rainbow fluorite.

All viewpoints expressed here are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. If concerned, seek attention from  your healthcare or spiritual provider.

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