What exactly does define a semiprecious gemstone?

What is a semiprecious gemstone?

What exactly does define a gemstone? The only thing that all gemstones have in common is that they are hard enough to be polished (even though some aren’t) and appealing enough that people want to use them in crafting jewelry and other works of art.

The definition of a semiprecious gemstone is so subjective and broad, that it is best to try to define some of the properties of the gemstone that create the quality and value that make it either “precious” or “semiprecious.”

The physical nature of gemstones are defined by many characteristics, including chemical composition, hardness, refractivity and its crystal system. Most gems are crystalline forms of minerals, and can be created in a variety of ways, from under the earth’s crust, in the water, or in the atmosphere. There is really only one thing you need to remember about gemstones, and that is their “hardness”.

The “Mohs Scale of Relative Mineral Hardness”, in use since 1812, is a valuable aid that’s designed to measure a gemstone’s hardness (or scratch resistance). “Hardness” is the resistance of a material to being scratched. The test is conducted by placing a sharp point of one specimen on an unmarked surface of another specimen & attempting to make a scratch.  A scratch will be a distinct groove cut in the mineral surface, not a mark on the surface that wipes away.

Some of the hardest semiprecious gemstones, including tourmaline and aquamarine, are available for purchase at my web store,  https://www.squareup.com/store/circlesofgemstones

The viewpoints expressed here are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. If concerned, seek attention from your healthcare or spiritual provider.

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